Player Analysis: Tajh Boyd, QB, Clemson

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image via Getty, via Sportsmancave.com

Name: Tajh Boyd

School: Clemson

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 222

40-Yard Dash: 4.84

In a nutshell: When Boyd is in a rhythm, he can throw sharp passes, especially on shorter routes, but gets shaky under heavy pressure. Boyd is elusive out of the pocket but prone to ditch it too early. Does not see the whole field and sometimes struggles to read defenses. Durability is a concern.

 

Senior Bowl: Boyd struggled in practices, and even among a shaky group of quarterbacks, his accuracy and overall play was unremarkable. You could tell he was not yet comfortable under center as well, and will take time to adapt to a pro-style offense. Boyd completed 7 of 16 passes for 31 yards and one interception in the game.

Player Analysis: Logan Thomas, QB, Virginia Tech

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image via examiner.com

Name: Logan Thomas

School: Virginia Tech

Height: 6’6”

Weight: 248

40-Yard Dash: 4.61

In a nutshell: Athletically, Thomas is an incredible prospect. His size, build and speed excite coaches, scouts and media across the NFL. Unfortunately, that’s most of what he has going for him. His ball placement is all over the place, his touch is almost non-existent and he doesn’t see enough of the field. Thomas has the raw pieces but is a real project.

Senior Bowl: Much like his career, Thomas’ Senior Bowl experience was a lot of buildup for naught. Despite looking impressive at the weigh-in, Thomas was inconsistent and streaky in practice, showing poor footwork and telegraphing his throws. Thomas also completed 4-of-5 passes in the game for a whopping 17 yards and finished with a -39 yards rushing.

Player Analysis: Brett Smith, QB, Wyoming

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image via zimbio.com

Name: Brett Smith

School: Wyoming

Height: 6’2”

Weight: 206

40-Yard Dash: N/A

In a nutshell: An incredibly underrated prospect, Smith didn’t even get a combine invite. He’s a quick, mobile quarterback who does a great job making his reads and adjusting based on coverage, but can be a bit too confident at times. He’s prone to try and fit the ball in tight coverage he should avoid.

Vs Hawaii: In what was easily Smith’s best game of the year—and his career—the Wyoming quarterback destroyed the Hawaii defense to the tune of 498 yards and seven touchdowns, adding in a 51-yard touchdown run which showed off his mobility. His eight touchdowns were the most by a single player in Mountain West history.

Player Analysis: A.J. McCarron, QB, Alabama

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image via roadtoradiocity.com

Name: A.J. McCarron

School: Alabama

Height: 6’3”

Weight: 220

40-Yard Dash: 4.94

In a nutshell: McCarron is comfortable in a pro-style offense, both under center and in a shotgun formation. He has solid accuracy on short-to-intermediate throws, though McCarron has a tendency to be off target on longer throws, forcing receivers to adjust too much. Does not have a huge arm, and benefitted from having an excellent offense around him.

 

Sugar Bowl: McCarron posted some great yardage and touchdown totals, but turned the ball over three times—two interceptions and one fumble which was returned for a touchdown. Both interceptions set up scores by Oklahoma as well. McCarron threw some really nice passes overall but made far too many mistakes.

Player Analysis: Aaron Murray, QB, Georgia

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image via ESPN.com

Name: Aaron Murray

School: Georgia

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 207

40-Yard Dash: N/A due to injury

In a nutshell: Murray tore his ACL during the 2013 season and is still rehabbing. Incredibly productive against top-shelf SEC competition, Murray is a four-year starter in a pro-style offense. Height and build are concerns, as is durability. Height and low release point contribute to batted balls, as does his average arm. Murray does get rattled under pressure and has fallen apart in big games.

Vs. #7 Auburn: While not flawless, Murray played some incredible football against Auburn in a huge game. After scoring on a scramble to take the lead, Georgia fell behind and Murray had to bring the offense to the Auburn 20 in under 25 seconds. His final pass fell incomplete, but otherwise Murray came through when they needed him.

Player Analysis: Zach Mettenberger, QB, LSU

**Due to time constraints I will merely be reprinting my work from the CHTV Draft Guide for WRs and QBs. I wish I had more time to write up all my notes but such is the life of a part time freelancer. Thanks for your understanding.**

image vi BleacherReport.com

Name: Zach Mettenberger

School: LSU

Height: 6’5”

Weight: 224

40-Yard Dash: N/A due to injury

In a nutshell: Mettenberger did not participate in any Combine drills due to a torn MCL/ACL injury which happened in November, and he may not be ready for LSU’s pro day. When healthy, Mettenberger shows extremely good arm strength, comes out of a pro-style offense and being a pocket passer, may not see much degradation in his game coming off his knee injury. Also has some character questions.

Vs #9 Georgia: Mettenberger was accurate and poised, putting his team in the lead of a shootout with 4:14 left to go in the game. On the drive he threw four straight completions, including a nice 27-yard pass to put LSU in scoring position. Unfortunately he couldn’t repeat the deed and threw four incompletions to end the game.

Player Analysis: Odell Beckham Jr, WR, LSU

image via SportsNola.com

Name: Odell Beckham Jr

Class: Junior
Height: 5’11”
Weight: 198 lbs.
School: LSU

image by Morgan Searles courtesy lsureveille.com

Strengths: Beckham is fast, but not just in a straight line. He can use his speed to gain separation, yes, but his routes are quick as well and he can accelerate through his breaks, making it easy for defensive backs to fall behind and stumble. Beckham is able to change gears both during routes as well as after the catch, making him a slippery guy to cover and contain. He’s worked to improve his hands as well (though he still has work to do), and does a good job going up and getting the ball in the air. Beckham has a nice, big catch radius as well, despite not having above-average height and adjusts well to the ball in the air and can catch it in stride without losing speed. He can also contribute on kickoff and punt returns, but was much less effective on the latter.

Weakness: Beckham has average height and not a ton of strength, but he does seem to have the frame to get bigger/stronger. The 4.43 speed at the combine was nice, but it doesn’t always translate on the field and he could get caught from behind by NFL-level defensive backs. While Beckham has improved hands, he still struggles with some drops and can’t be relied on across the middle where he sometimes seems to hear footsteps. Beckham doesn’t always come down with balls he needs to fight for and I’d like to see more toughness in that area of his game—a little more “my ball” mentality. He’s not great at blocking and needs to improve that aspect of his game. Struggled against top teams like Alabama and Florida as well as Texas A&M though he did well against a No. 9 ranked Georgia. And while he can shag punts and kicks, his work on punt returns leaves something to be desired. Rarely found the end zone before this year, scoring just 12 touchdowns on 143 receptions.

Intangibles: By all accounts, Beckham is a very dedicated, very hard-working receiver. He also certainly shows a passion for the game, which translates into more focus on both of the above traits..

Notes: If he were more consistent or fought harder for the ball, Beckham would probably be higher on the list, but that, his height and lack of elite game speed drag his value down. It will be interesting to see how the acceleration and extra gears he shows on film are enough to get past faster corners in the NFL. I could see him out of the slot or maybe as the “Z” if he can show that the speed he flashed at the combine—and what he showed on tape—combine to work at the pro level.

image by Jerry Ward via SportsNola.com