Player Analysis: Johnny Manziel, QB, Texas A&M

screencap courtesy CBS Sports

Name: Johnny Manziel

Class: Redshirt Sophomore
Height: 5’11”
Weight: 207 lbs.
School: Texas A&M

Strengths: Manziel’s game is predicated on mobility, as his ability to move outside the pocket is outstanding and he is far more comfortable throwing on the move than staying home in the pocket. However, Manziel also made some big improvements as a pocket passer this past season, though there is still room for improvement. Manziel told the media at the Combine that while sometimes you need to move outside of the pocket “I want to be a guy who can drop back and go through my progressions, go through my reads and really take what’s given to me by the defense.” Manziel does do a good job of keeping his eyes downfield even when scrambling and can look a defender off when moving, so that he can get a receiver open. Manziel is not afraid to throw the ball up and let his receiver make a play, something he did frequently with Mike Evans in 2013. While he wants to continue to be a mobile quarterback, Manziel has acknowledged that he will have to play smarter in the NFL to stay healthy, telling the press at the combine,

screencap courtesy CBS Sports

“You have to be on the field, you have to be healthy to be a great player. Stay healthy, be able to slide, pick your poison really when you need to go out and get a first down and when you need to do some things. Stay healthy, slide when you need to and have better ball security, which is what I’m working on as well.”  Manziel isn’t a big guy but he has large hands, which should help him with ball security. Quite often played big in big situations during his collegiate career and finds a way to sustain drives when his team needs him to. Was wildly successful in his two years starting.

Weakness: While he has worked on his pocket-passing skills, Manziel still leaves the pocket too early at times. His height and build are concerns given his tendency to run and whether he can stay healthy in the NFL is a big concern. Was able to have Evans bail him out on big throws, but needs to be more picky about when he risks it, and may lack a receiver like Evans at the next level making those throws more dangerous. Manziel has not done a ton of work under center, and will need to further adjust an already sometimes questionable technique. While he can stretch a play out, he sometimes does it for too long—occasionally tossing up some ill-advised passes. There are times he just needs to get rid of the ball and he hasn’t done so consistently. While he had a great two years at A&M,  it was only two years so his experience as a collegiate starter is minimal. As he mentioned at the combine, learning to slide, staying healthy and ball security are things he is working on. The biggest concern from a football standpoint comes down to whether he can adapt to the speed of the NFL and overcome issues with his height. A guy like Russell Wilson is a success because he does a tremendous job lining up his offensive line to give himself passing lanes to see through. Can Manziel learn to do that, or something like it? That’s a real concern.

Screencap courtesy CBS Sports

Intangibles: Much has been made of Manziel’s off-the-field lifestyle in college—maybe too much.  It’s hard to begrudge a young man some fun in college, but the real issue is whether he can become an adult and a professional and put funtime aside now that college is over.  Certainly there have been many kids coming out of college under less of a spotlight who failed. Manziel was adamant that his college time is over and he;s ready to work, saying at the combine, “I believe whenever I decided to make this decision to turn professional it was a time to really put my college years in the past. This is a job now. There’s guys’ families, coaches’ families and jobs and all kinds of things on the line.” Manziel passed on numerous chances to get his face in front of the camera during the Super Bowl and declined, deciding instead to remain focused on football and improving his game. That speaks volumes to me. There have also been questions about how much he is dedicated to football and how hard he works. Without being at Texas A&M when he works, all I can do is relay what I have been told and what I have read.  I have heard plenty from people who say Manziel is a hard worker and puts in a ton of time during the week.  While I may not have all the inside scoop, I’ve heard enough to think that he has every intention (and ability) to put in the hours to get better. Of course, as they say on Game of Thrones: words are wind. He will have to prove it.

Notes:  A lot has been written about who Manziel is and what he’s about. It’s hard to avoid getting swept up in the persona we see in the media and have relayed to us via media repeating things agenda driven scouts tell them.  This is not to dismiss Manziel’s off-field issues. Prior to seeing him speak at the combine, Manziel came off to me as a bit of an entitled brat. Certainly you aren’t out of your mind tho think that if he changes, maybe he reverts once he gets to his goals. But if you get past the narrative, there’s a lot more to him and I feel as though we are writing him off unfairly from a personality standpoint. That said, there are issues from a football standpoint which are also a concern, not the least of which is the fundamental question of whether he can avoid injury and make better decisions.

Of the quarterbacks in this class, I feel Manziel has the highest ceiling and the most exciting upside. However, his floor is lower than either Bridgewater or Bortles as well. A team will have to build an offense around him in a way you don’t need to with other quarterbacks and while some could, overall that’s not a tendency a lot of NFL coaches have.

All that said, if in the right spot, Manziel has the chance to be a tremendous quarterback in the NFL and for that upside, I’ve ranked him as high as I have.

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