Fantasy Football 2013: Buying or Selling Value of Top Preseason Stars (B/R)

This past week we took a look at who really is going to be as good as they looked in the preseason and who might not be.

There’s little more precarious than trying to figure out what preseason really means in terms of fantasy football value, so as always, I am happy to help.

Here’s a sample as always:

BUY: DeAndre Hopkins, Wide Receiver, Houston Texans

Hopkins looks like the solution to Houston’s longstanding quest to find a receiver opposite Andre Johnson. Johnson attracts the lion’s share of the secondary attention, but so far nobody has been able to regularly take advantage of that.

But that’s where the former Clemson University wide receiver comes in.

While he has missed most of the preseason due to a concussion, and according to CBS Houston, still isn’t through the NFL‘s concussion protocols, Hopkins should be ready to go Week 1.

What we saw in the small preseason sample was impressive, though. Hopkins caught a total of six balls for 74 yards and a touchdown.

The touchdown—which came in the second quarter against the Minnesota Vikings—was a good example of what the wide receiver is capable of. In single coverage against cornerback Bobby Felder—who admittedly is a depth guy and may not be on the roster come Week 1—Hopkins ran a simple go route towards the end zone.

Felder stayed with him, but as the pass from T.J. Yates came in—a high, lofting ball—Hopkins leapt up, caught it at the high point of his jump and came down. Felder got his hand on the ball a bit but was turned around, and Hopkins held on as they fell to the turf in the end zone.

On the broadcast, announcer Spencer Tillman relayed a story about when he asked Houston wide receivers coach Larry Kirksey if Hopkins could catch in traffic. They said Kirksey simply told them, “There’s nothing he [Hopkins] can’t do.”

Hopkins can take advantage of the space created by his size and frame, while his speed can create separation.

That won’t change in the regular season.

As always you can read the whole thing at Bleacher Report.